Fall Retreat

2016 Fall Retreat
Saturday November 12, 2016
9:00 am to 5:00 pm at Gwinwood Conference Center in Lacey
“Interracial and Intergenerational Movement Building: Weaving Activism into Our Lives”

A richly diverse group of people is planning this year’s program, and we hope to see you there! We are inspired by our theme, and we are a reflection of its commitment to working across racial and generational boundaries. We are committed to creating safe space within which we can have the courageous conversations necessary to create the more just, equitable, and sustainable world we all seek.
— the 2016 planning committee

View or download the 2016 Fall Retreat Flyer by Clicking here

Tentative activity topics:
(These topics are likely, but not yet confirmed. We plan to weave our theme throughout our day’s activities.)
1. Privilege and oppression: developing awareness and understanding, and taking action.
2. Creating safe and welcoming schools by addressing issues of race, cultural heritage, and LGBTQ identity.
3. Building a diverse, interracial, and intergenerational coalition for racial, economic, and climate justice, and native sovereignty.
4. Intergenerational story-telling, relationship-building, and movement-building collaboration.
5. Exploring the power of social media in movement-building.

Please join with us on Saturday November 12 for WWFOR’s 2016 Fall Retreat.
We will provide coffee and tea, but no food. Bring your own lunch. No restaurants are nearby.
We will post more information – and an opportunity to pre-register– to www.wwfor.org and www.olympiafor.org
Pre-registering early (preferably by Wednesday, November 9) will help us plan for a productive day!

Download the 2016 Fall Retreat Flyer to Pre-Register

Questions?  Contact Glen Anderson at (360) 491-9093 or glen@olympiafor.org
Location and directions to the old main lodge of Gwinwood Conference Center, 6015 30thAve SE in Lacey (SE of Olympia).
From the north:Take I-5 to Exit 109. Turn right onto Martin Way, left onto College Street, left onto Lacey Boulevard, right onto Ruddell Road, lefton 25th Ave SE, right on Hicks Lake Road SE, left on 30th Ave SE, right into Gwinwood and see the old main lodge straight ahead.  Free parking is in front of the building and beyond it.
From the south:Take I-5 to Exit 108.  Follow the long exit to College Street.  Turn right onto College.  Then follow the rest of the above directions.
Cost: We keep costs low and try to just barely break even.  We can cover our costs if we average $15 per person, but we welcome people regardless of ability to pay.  Anything from $0 on up would be just fine.  Persons who can afford to give more will help offset the cost for those whohave less.  One way to keep the cost low is to ask each person to PLEASE BRING YOUR OWN LUNCH. We provide coffeeand tea throughout the day, but no food

=======================================================

[last year] WWFOR Fall Retreat: November 7, 2015
Practical Democracy: How Can We Make it Work for All of Us?

View the 2015 Fall Retreat  flyer and pre-registration form.

IMG_20151107_141111

All across our nation, people are outraged that democracy is being stolen away from us:

  1. Our economy has been hijacked by the 1% — and even the 1% of the 1% — forcing the rest of us to suffer with lower incomes and austerity cutbacks in basic services.
  2. The public wants peace, but the military-industrial complex and “national-security state” launch endless wars.
  3. The public wants food that is safe and healthful, energy that is clean and renewable, and health care that is affordable and available, but instead giant corporations – and the politicians they fund and lobby – give us the opposite.
  4. This anti-democratic pattern repeats itself in all sectors:  Fossil fuel companies worsen the climate crisis; the gun lobby prevents laws to reduce gun violence; real estate developers causes local governments to continue suburban sprawl, profit-making companies privatize schools and lay off teachers, giant corporations consolidate ownership of news media to become monopolies and lock out alternative voices, political parties pass laws and gerrymander districts to promote their own candidates and reduce minority voting, and the list goes on.
  5. Many of our federal, state and local governments are run by people who are grossly ignorant, mean-spirited and corrupt.

The American people deeply value the principle of democracy, but nationally and locally, rich and powerful entities have corrupted the government to serve their narrow interests instead of the broad public interest. Some of the anti-democratic behaviors above have antagonized – or prevented – voting to such an extent that the U.S. has the lowest voting turnout of any traditionally democratic nation.

But elections are only a little part of what democracy means. Practical democracy would empower ordinary people – not limited to those eligible to vote – to equip themselves with accurate information, and it would empower them to wield actual power all year around, not just on certain election days. It would do this not only for electing government officials, but also for making substantive decisions in all sectors (economics, energy, environment, media, policing, social justice issues, governmental accountability, etc.). Practical democracy would make the principle of democracy come to life in every aspect of our daily lives!

Big political parties and the extremely rich persons and businesses that fund them try to distract us from the real issues and narrow our focus to mere electioneering.  We must broaden and deepen our vision to applying democracy’s principles in practical ways to help our people and our planet.

Please join with us on Saturday November 7 for the Western Washington Fellowship of Reconciliation’s 2015 Fall Retreat. We will enjoy an inspiring and practical keynote by Mary Lou Finley, who has decades of experience with grassroots movements for social and political change.

Then you can choose from among four morning workshops and four more in the afternoon. These eight workshop topics are:

  1. How white folks can organize for racial justice
  2. How to organize now for single-payer health care
  3. How to use Saul Alinsky’s classic model of local organizing
  4. How to monitor local governments to hold them accountable
  5. How to build the Move to Amend movement to fix campaign financing
  6. How people can create their own progressive media (print, radio, TV, blogs)
  7. How to organize effective grassroots direct action against oil and coal abuses
  8. How to strategize for nonviolent grassroots movements for social and political change

Together, we’ll make progress toward practical democracy.

At 9:00 am the WWFOR Fall Retreat will welcome people with light refreshments and social time. We’ll begin in earnest at 10:00 am and continue (with your own brownbag lunch) until 5:00 pm. We’ll offer light refreshments continually throughout the day.

The Fall Retreat will occur at the Gwinwood Conference Center in Lacey. (See driving directions below.)

We suggest a $15 donation to help cover costs.
(See more information below.)

For information Glen Anderson, (360) 491-9093 glen@olympiafor.org

This flyer will be posted at both www.olympiafor.org and www.wwfor.org

Pre-registration helps us better plan the day, so if possible, please pre-register by Wed. Nov. 4. Even if you can’t pre-register by Wed. Nov. 4, please come anyway!

To Pre-Register: Download the form using the link at the top of the page.

Questions? Contact Glen Anderson at (360) 491-9093 glen@olympiafor.org

Directions to the Gwinwood Conference Center (the old main lodge) in Lacey, near Olympia.

From the north: Take I-5 to Exit 109. Turn right onto Martin Way, left onto College Street, left onto Lacey Boulevard, right onto Ruddell Road, left on 25th Ave SE, right on Hicks Lake Road SE, left on 30th Ave SE, right into Gwinwood and see the old main lodge straight ahead. Parking is in front of the building and beyond it.

From the south: Take I-5 to Exit 108. Follow the long exit to College Street. Turn right onto College. Follow the rest of the above directions.

Cost: We keep costs low and try to just barely break even. We can cover our costs if we average $15 per person. We give discounts to young and low-income people upon request. Persons who can afford to give more will help offset the cost for those who have less. One way to keep the cost low is to ask each person to PLEASE BRING YOUR OWN LUNCH. We provide coffee, tea, and light refreshments throughout the day.

THANK YOU!

 

 

 

——————————————————————-

Note: the information below is from 2014’s event.

WWFOR Fall Retreat: November 8, 2014
“Economic Justice for the 99%”

Most Americans are suffering from economic injustice in one or more ways.  Many millions can’t find decent jobs or work for wages that are too low.  The gap between extremely rich people and everyone else has been widening since the 1970s.  Many Americans are homeless or are suffering from foreclosure.

The Occupy Movement and millions of Americans’ ongoing experiences have convinced more and more people that capitalism is failing to meet most people’s needs, so they are looking for alternatives.  Western Washington FOR’s 2014 Fall Retreat – “Economic Justice for the 99%” – will bring us together to better understand the problems and to work together at the grassroots to organize solutions.

Everyone is invited to WWFOR’s 2014 Fall Retreat in a pleasant setting in Lacey, near Olympia.  Our annual Fall retreat on Saturday November 8 will bring people together from throughout our region to stimulate grassroots progress toward economic justice.  We are planning a keynote, workshops, and small groups to share information and work on solutions, especially after we return home that evening.

View the 2014 Fall Retreat flyer.

Check back here for updates or contact Glen Anderson at (360) 491-9093 or glen@olympiafor.org.

At 9:00 a.m. we will welcome people with light refreshments and social time.  We’ll begin in earnest at 10:00 a.m. and continue (with your own brownbag lunch) until 5:00 p.m.  The Fall Retreat will occur in the rustic Old Main Lodge at the Gwinwood Conference Center in Lacey.

The WWFOR Fall Retreat is held at the Gwinwood Conference Center (the old main lodge) in Lacey, near Olympia.

From the north, take I-5 to Exit 109.  Turn right onto Martin Way, left onto College Street, left onto Lacey Boulevard, right onto Ruddell Road, left on 25th Ave SE, right on Hicks Lake Road SE, left on 30th Ave SE, right into Gwinwood and see the Old Main Lodge straight ahead when you first enter the conference center.  Parking is in front of the building and beyond it.

From the south, take I-5 to Exit 108.  Follow the very long exit to College Street.  Turn right onto College and follow the rest of the above directions.

Cost:  We keep costs low and try to just barely break even.  $15 per person will cover our costs.  We give discounts to young and low-income people upon request.  Persons who can afford to give more will help offset the cost for those who have less.  Part of keeping the cost low is for you to BRING YOUR OWN LUNCH.  We will provide coffee, tea, and light refreshments throughout the day.

Questions?  Contact Glen Anderson at (360) 491-9093 glen@olympiafor.org

—————————————————-

The 2013 WWFOR Fall Retreat, “Realities of the ‘New Jim Crow.’ What Will I Do? What Will We Do?” brought together about 60 activists from the region. You can watch the excellent keynote by Mary Paterson (of No New Jim Crow Seattle). [Thanks to Robert Whitlock for filming and Todd Boyle for editing.]

Mary and our other presenters offered workshops that allowed participants to learn more and explore future actions. We hope that the follow up from the retreat will reinvigorate FOR members to connect racial and economic justice to issues of militarism and to work with our allies on these issues.

You can read more about some follow up ideas at http://www.wwfor.org/the-pacific-call/what-will-we-do-moving-beyond-fall-retreat/

You can still view the 2013 flyer with details and registration form. (Pre-registration helps us better plan the day.)

The original Jim Crow laws were racially motivated state and local laws in the United States enacted between 1876 and 1965.  Examples of those Jim Crow laws were the racial segregation of public schools, public transportation, the U.S. military and of public places, such as restrooms, restaurants, and drinking fountains.

The New Jim Crow is a name given to a category of more recent race-related social, political, and legal phenomena in the U.S.  Interconnected issues include the school-to-prison pipeline, economic disparity, voter suppression, immigration, racial profiling, juvenile justice, and the so-called war on drugs.

WWFOR’s 2013 Fall Retreat will present a forum to discuss such issues as:

  • How can we be effective allies with others seeking justice?
  • What can I do in my daily life that will make a difference?
  • Should we plan a larger regional conference concerning the police and racial justice?
  • Why and How do we move (or not move) to action?  What motivates us?

Michelle Alexander wrote in blog on August 28, 2013:
“In my view, the most important lesson we can learn from Dr. King is not what he said at the March in Washington, but what he said and did after.  In the years that followed, he did not play politics to see what crumbs a fundamentally corrupt system might toss to the beggars of justice.  Instead he connected the dots and committed himself to building a movement that would shake the foundations of our economic and social order, so that the dreams that he preached in 1963 might one day be a reality for all.

“He said that nothing less than “a radical restructuring of society” could possibly ensure justice and dignity for all.  He was right.  I am still committed to building a movement to end mass incarceration, but I will not do it with blinders on.  If all we do is end mass incarceration, this movement will not have gone nearly far enough.  A new system of racial and social control will be born again, all because we did not do what King demanded we do: connect the dots between poverty, racism, militarism and materialism.  I am getting out of my lane.  I hope you’re already out of yours.”
 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.